Monday, January 22, 2007

Sustainable Live Electroacoustic Music

.:Sustainable Live Electroacoustic Music:.

Above is a link to an article that discusses the sustainability archiving of electroacoustic music. The author states that the sustainability of the genre is in jeoporady becuase of the fast eveolving technology curve with gear in the genre, and in music production in general. Quite and interesting read. We always think about how the progress of our computer based music environments progresses our music, making us able to perform anything, yet we fail to realize that some music may be lost due to the aesthetic or inane qualities of the orginal tools. Chiptune and old tracker music that utilizes .MOD files immediately comes to mind. These were once the staples of playing music on the computer, and now many musicians don't even know what they are, or computers require emulators to play back the .MOD files.

Abstract:

Real-time/performed electroacoustic music (also known as live electroacoustic music) is currently facing a serious sustainability problem: while its production is indeed considered very recent from the music history point of view, several technological generations and revolutions have gone by in the meantime. Thus, most of these works can hardly be performed because the technologies used have gone lost since a long time and no long-standing notational precaution was taken. This paper presents some typical case studies and examples and introduces some techniques that might lead to a partial — when not completely adequate — solution to the sustainability problem.

3 comments:

J. Wells said...

I really miss the old .MOD trackers. I first began composing music on Fasttracker 2.0 for DOS about ten years ago, but even then trackers were going the way of 8-tracks. I've still never found a software interface that I've been so comfortable with. Oh, and I also use Atari Notator, just like Stockhausen. *laff*

The article brings up a whole lot of good ideas, even if it does treat the concept of live electronic music in a somewhat ham-fisted way by lumping it in under the general "works of art" terminology. In my personal view, there's no way around obsolesence. It's not an abstract concept to be foiled, it's a fact of life. Things will pass out of usage as time goes on. No matter how well we try to preserve them, whatever media we have access to at that time will someday be considered inadequate. That's why we have people like museum curators and art historians-- people whose function in society is to care about this crap after everyone else forgets about it.

Just my $.o2

M.A.S. said...

Have you thought of re-exploring the Tracker at all? When I was a windows user I used Buzz Tracker almost exclusively for my production.

There is currently Renoise which is a quite highly developed modern tracker, and the development of Milky Tracker, which is a great remake of FT2 which can be played on just about any OS. It even loads up old .MOD and .XM files.

Another notable tracker on the moder side would be Psycle, which was a derivative project from Buzz quite some time back.

J. Wells said...

Ooh, +any+ OS? See, I gave up on Windows years ago after watching it rape computer after computer into obsolescence and death, and I haven't come across any trackers for Mac OS or OSX. And FT2 alone wouldn't be worth finding an old DOS machine and cramming it into my already tight music space.

I'll have to check it out...